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Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Enters into Force

CSC event

The Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear damage (CSC) constitutes an integral part of the global nuclear liabiltiy regime. (Photo: D. Calma/IAEA)

The Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear damage (CSC) entered into force today.

The CSC was adopted on 12 September 1997 together with the Protocol to Amend the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage. The Convention stipulates that at least five signatory States with a minimum of 400,000 units of installed nuclear capacity have to deposit their instrument of ratification, acceptance or approval with the IAEA before it can enter into force and Japan's deposit of its instrument of acceptance, on 15 January 2015, triggered the Convention's entry into force three months later. Apart from Japan, five other States have adhered to the Convention: Argentina, Morocco, Romania, the United Arab Emirates, and the United States.

The CSC aims at increasing the amount of compensation available in the event of a nuclear accident through public funds to be made available by the Contracting Parties on the basis of their installed nuclear capacity and UN rate of assessment. It also aims at establishing treaty relations among States that belong to  the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage, the Paris Convention on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy or neither of them, while leaving intact the 1988 Joint Protocol that establishes treaty relations among States that belong to the Vienna Convention or the Paris Convention.

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