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IAEA Work Commended at Non-Proliferation Conference

Carnegie Conference

The 2004 Carnegie International Non-Proliferation Conference was held at the Ronald Reagan International Trade Center, Washington, D.C. (Credit: CEIP)

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The IAEA´s work and leadership to help the world curb the spread of nuclear weapons were commended at the 2004 Non-Proliferation Conference of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. IAEA Director General Mohamed ElBaradei was among a distinguished group of keynote speakers addressing nuclear and security issues.

"The need for substantive change - to the international security system in general and to the nuclear non-proliferation regime in particular - has become even more obvious and urgent," Dr. ElBaradei said. He outlined proposals for strengthening the global regime, which along with proposals developed by others, he said "should be the focus of a summit on non-proliferation and global security", possibly in 2005 when parties to the global Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) meet to review the treaty.

Among other keynote speakers was Sam Nunn, former US Senator and current Co-Chairman and CEO of the Nuclear Threat Initiative. In reviewing the changing non-proliferation landscape, he singled out the IAEA for its leading role. "It would be a mistake to ignore our successes, for they give us guidance and inspiration for the work ahead," he said. "Nearly 60 years have passed without a nuclear attack occurring anywhere in the world, in part because of the Non-Proliferation Treaty. The International Atomic Energy Agency and its Director General ElBaradei, after doing so much for so long with so little, are finally beginning to receive the added resources that their performance deserves and the task required. I think they're doing an exceptional job."

For more information on the Carnegie Conference, including texts of speeches, visit the CEIP web site.